Devonshire Cut Rounds

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Devonshire Cut Rounds

Postby Oldends » January 1st, 2011, 2:59 pm

In the latest episode of The Edwardian Farm on BBC2, Ruth made Devonshire cut rounds that were used for traditional Devon cream teas rather than scones. Alas no recipe was given, the ingredients included beaten egg, butter, plain flour, milk, milk powder, butter milk and baking powder. Note that there was no yeast. The mixture was brought together, rolled into a fat sausage and then cut into chunks which were then baked.

Does anyone, perhaps Paul, have any detailed instructions?
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Re: Devonshire Cut Rounds

Postby Kitewatcher » January 1st, 2011, 4:13 pm

Could they be what are also know as Fat Rascals. Sorry, didn't see the programme, will catch it on the repeat.
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Re: Devonshire Cut Rounds

Postby Oldends » January 1st, 2011, 5:08 pm

As I understand it, the Fat Rascal has currants and candied peel, both absent from cut rounds.
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Re: Devonshire Cut Rounds

Postby hypercharleyfarley » January 1st, 2011, 5:10 pm

Hello - I wondered about the recipe too, & having had another look via i-player am not really any the wiser! Have done a bit of googling & it appears that some people maintain that the traditional "cut round" was rather "bready" in that it did have yeast as an ingredient, and/or that milk loaf dough was used. None of the recipes I found used dried milk. I'm now wondering whether the ingredients shown in the programme were the chef's own version.
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Re: Devonshire Cut Rounds

Postby suffolk » January 1st, 2011, 9:50 pm

Being fascinated, I googled and came up with this http://www.sugarvine.com/devonandcornwa ... uestion=82
Seems like a can of worms :D
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Re: Devonshire Cut Rounds

Postby aero280 » January 1st, 2011, 10:43 pm

When I was growing up in Plymouth we used to get these bread rolls from the baker. They were called "Tuff Cakes" or "Splits". But they were just a soft white bread roll. I don't remember them being anything more exotic than that. No milk. No sugar. But it would have been in the late 40's early 50's so rationing may have played apart in the ingredients.

But whatever they were, we ate them with jam and cream, or sometimes with Shippams fish paste. The argument we had with our parents was whether we could butter them before the jam and cream (or the fish paste) went on. On a good day we got them filled with ham and Heinz Sandwich Spread! :)

Never heard of these being called "cut rounds". The Edwardian farm is being filmed a mile or two up-river from Plymouth. I'm sure I would have heard of the term if it was used in the Tamar Valley. Maybe it's a North Devon term? North Devon was a different country to us.
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Re: Devonshire Cut Rounds

Postby Breadandwine » January 2nd, 2011, 1:42 am

Fascinating!

I'd never heard of these.

Matthew Mason's explanation on the link that suffolk gave seems to me to be the more authentic of the 2 we've been given.

Milk, milk powder and buttermilk altogether in a recipe doesn't seem to be all that traditional - whereas a brioche-type roll would suggest bread flour as well as butter, and perhaps eggs.

I do like the method of shaping you mention, Oldends (and thanks for posting this!). I can quite see myself cutting slices as if I was slicing a thick sausage.

Love the story about the jam and cream and Shippams fish paste, Will! Just as long as you didn't mix the two, eh?

I have to say I'm with your parents on this - the cream replaces the butter, which is why it goes on first! :duck: :duck:

:lol:

Cheers, Paul
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Re: Devonshire Cut Rounds

Postby suffolk » January 2nd, 2011, 7:48 am

Paulthebread wrote:I have to say I'm with your parents on this - the cream replaces the butter, which is why it goes on first!


Absolutely agree Paul - the logic is indisputable :hug: :duck: :duck:

And I'm sure I've had Devonshire splits as part of a cream tea - maybe when I was a child - that's a long time ago now :oops:
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Re: Devonshire Cut Rounds

Postby suffolk » January 2nd, 2011, 7:59 am

I found this link when looking up info for our holiday on Bodmin - it describes Cornish Splits as "sweet white finger rolls"
http://www.cornwalls.co.uk/food/cornish_cream_tea.htm

:idea: :idea: :idea: I've just remembered, you can buy Devonshire Splits as a cream cake at bakers' shops! They're also one of the four cream cakes in a Tesco box of cream cakes - they're a bit like a soft fluffy doughnut in texture and taste - I'm sure you've all seen them :chops:
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Re: Devonshire Cut Rounds

Postby Oldends » January 2nd, 2011, 10:06 am

Matthew Mason says that the rounds were made using yeast whereas the Richard Hunt in the programme says that there was no yeast. Both agree that the rounds are a form of bread.

The Edwardian Farm has a blog/message board and several of the recent posts have been about the recipe. One of them, from ‘dontblameme’, includes the following…

Ingredients
170g/6oz self-raising flour
170g/6oz plain flour
½ tsp salt
½ tsp bicarbonate of soda
290ml/½ pint buttermilk

Preparation
1. Preheat the oven to 400F/200C/Gas 6.
2. Tip the flours, salt and bicarbonate of soda into a large mixing bowl and stir.
3. Make a well in the centre and pour in the buttermilk, mixing quickly with a large fork to form a soft dough. (Depending upon the absorbency of the flour, you may need to add a little milk if the dough seems too stiff but it should not be too wet or sticky.)
4. Turn onto a lightly floured surface and knead briefly.
5. Form into a long round sausage and then cut from length the thickness rounds you require and place on floured baking sheet.
6. Bake for about 30 minutes then cool on a wire rack.
NB: As mentioned on the programme it is the interaction between the Bicarb and the Buttermilk that will cause the mixture to rise. Add dried fruit if using for cream teas.
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Re: Devonshire Cut Rounds

Postby Suelle » January 2nd, 2011, 10:29 am

Oldends wrote:Ingredients
170g/6oz self-raising flour
170g/6oz plain flour
½ tsp salt
½ tsp bicarbonate of soda
290ml/½ pint buttermilk


This would make them a type of soda bread, although it's not what you remember from the programme, judging by your original post.
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Re: Devonshire Cut Rounds

Postby suffolk » January 2nd, 2011, 10:41 am

I'm fixated by this and have kept on googling - I came up with Nigel Slater's take on the Split/Chudleigh conundrum http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/ ... ea-recipes and there's a picture :D
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Re: Devonshire Cut Rounds

Postby aero280 » January 2nd, 2011, 11:57 am

Nigel's splits look right to me. :)
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Re: Devonshire Cut Rounds

Postby Oldends » January 2nd, 2011, 1:08 pm

In the televised version there was definitely no yeast. That does indeed make it a soda bread not unlike Paul's 'bread in 13 minutes'. Rounds or splits were clearly subject to local variations, some with yeast and some without. So, too, was the name! The proof of the pudding, of course, is in the eating but that will have to wait until there's time. And until I can get some clotted cream!
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Re: Devonshire Cut Rounds

Postby aero280 » January 2nd, 2011, 1:26 pm

The other problem that you may have is that in the Tamar Valley the term "buttermilk" was used for the milk that was left after the butter had been churned. It was not the fermented yogurty stuff sold as buttermilk in supermarkets today.

On the other hand, supermarket buttermilk may be nearer the sour milk that my family always used in scones and stuff to add the acidic content to food risen with bicarb.
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Re: Devonshire Cut Rounds

Postby suffolk » January 2nd, 2011, 2:29 pm

aero280 wrote:The other problem that you may have is that in the Tamar Valley the term "buttermilk" was used for the milk that was left after the butter had been churned. It was not the fermented yogurty stuff sold as buttermilk in supermarkets today.


Very good point! The cultured buttermilk available commercially is very different stuff to the buttermilk produced in the farmhouse dairies I just about remember.
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Re: Devonshire Cut Rounds a genuine recipe

Postby Maggie » January 2nd, 2011, 4:22 pm

I have been trying everywhere to find the correct recipe for "cut rounds" as it looked to be the best type of scones that I have seen.

Eventually I have the recipe from the horses mouth. What a kind and helpful person Richard Hunt is. Thanks!

Recipe for Cut Rounds by Richard Hunt, Executive Chef, The Grand Hotel, Torquay

Makes 12 approx

Ingredients
500gm Plain Flour
50gm Milk Powder
35gm Baking Powder
50gm Butter
220ml Buttermilk
70ml Milk
(If you like a sweet version add 30gm Caster Sugar)
Beaten egg to Glaze
Method
1. Preheat the Oven to 180c or Gas 6
2. Put all the dry ingredients into a bowl
3. Rub in the Butter
4. Mix in the Buttermilk, and Normal milk, bring together until a soft dough is reached
5. Please use your hands, not a mixer, as you will over tighten the dough!!
6. Roll into a cylinder shape about 3 inches across
7. Cut into pieces approx 60gm each
8. Slightly press to a nice shape
9. Place on the Baking Tray and Glaze with egg
10. Bake for 14-18 minutes until golden and risen
Notes
The dough must be soft not dry, don’t be afraid to add a touch more liquid if you are not happy with the consistency

Happy cooking!
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Re: Devonshire Cut Rounds

Postby Suelle » January 2nd, 2011, 5:43 pm

Maggie wrote:Eventually I have the recipe from the horses mouth. What a kind and helpful person Richard Hunt is. Thanks!


And thank you for going to the trouble of hunting it/him down, and passing the recipe on!
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Re: Devonshire Cut Rounds

Postby Foodycat » January 2nd, 2011, 6:03 pm

http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/ ... ea-recipes Nigel Slater weighed in with his Devonshire splits earlier this year.
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Re: Devonshire Cut Rounds

Postby Riocaz » January 3rd, 2011, 3:46 pm

suffolk wrote:Being fascinated, I googled and came up with this http://www.sugarvine.com/devonandcornwa ... uestion=82
Seems like a can of worms :D


Having just read a bit of this site I would worry that the chef cant tell the difference between a pudding and a pie... Or that he advises that the shiny side of foil reflects heat away...
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Re: Devonshire Cut Rounds

Postby 2tarsome » January 4th, 2011, 8:08 pm

Thanks so much for the Cut Rounds recipe!

I'm from the southern United States (and obsessed with Edwardian Farm) and this recipe really stuck out to me because these "cut rounds" are identical to what we simply refer to as "biscuits" - which are the most common bread in the South and still everywhere. As prepared by Richard in this episode, the recipe (save the milk powder) is just like our biscuits which are also used throughout the US as a breakfast bread - they're sometimes called "southern style biscuits" or "buttermilk biscuits" here too. I'm very curious to see how this recipe compares to our traditional one. It's especially interesting to me because people in the US constantly refer to scones as a relative of the biscuit but this recipe is so close, I have to imagine it must be more of a direct descendant from cut rounds.
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Re: Devonshire Cut Rounds

Postby frenchcheesequeen » January 5th, 2011, 10:41 pm

I once knew a Canadian woman who made what she called biscuits using more or less the ingredients and methods as listed. She measured by volume and put cold water into a measuring jug and then added the butter and used the displacement figure to ensure it was right. I thought it fascinating the way she did it and when she rolled out the sausage and cut chunks off I was totally gobsmacked!

By the way - don't Devonshire Splits have to have golden syrup or treacle rather than jam?
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Re: Devonshire Cut Rounds

Postby aero280 » January 5th, 2011, 11:17 pm

Not when I was in Devon! We had splits with a red jam and clotted cream.

There was a cottage industry at the time. My father used to come home with farm-made clotted cream. It came in an old jam jar with either a screw top or greaseproof/cellophane lid held on with a rubber band.

The jam was usually strawberry or raspberry. Occasionally blackcurrant, blackberry or loganberry. I don't remember golden syrup on bread, although there was a lot of golden syrup about the house, but it usually went on hot puddings - suet pudding, spotted dick or just plain boiled rice.

Having said all that I have a memory of clotted cream and golden syrup, but not often and I think it was on slices of bread. Not sure.
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Re: Devonshire Cut Rounds

Postby suffolk » January 6th, 2011, 7:43 am

Carol, is this what you were thinking of ? :)

"Cornish purists might also remind us that the combination of jam and cream is traditionally enjoyed not on scones but on sweetened white finger rolls known as splits. Splits are also the base of another Cornish treat for the sweet-toothed; Thunder and Lightning, where jam is replaced with glistening golden syrup for a serious sugar hit." http://www.cornwalls.co.uk/food/cornish_cream_tea.htm
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Re: Devonshire Cut Rounds

Postby aero280 » January 6th, 2011, 10:56 am

Ooooh! Yeeeeees!

Thunder and lightning! :)

It was also used to describe golden syrup and clotted cream as a topping to vanilla ice cream.

You're all bringing back memories of fifty/sixty years ago. :)
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Re: Devonshire Cut Rounds

Postby scullion » January 6th, 2011, 2:45 pm

thunder and lightning is still here and going strong!
i've only known it with bread (but then that is all a split is anyway). one of the specialist ice cream makers (langage farm) -available at tesco here- does a really nice thunder and lightning ice cream.
but clotted cream on top of ice cream is something else! hmmm... the solid sheet of cream closest to the ice cream ....quick fantasy there!
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Re: Devonshire Cut Rounds

Postby aero280 » January 6th, 2011, 2:51 pm

Stop it!!!!!! Frozen clotted cream :) :kneel: :luv:

I used to eat loads of Langage Farm ice cream, their farm shop was on the way back to London after a visit to the family. The farm is a trading estate now. :(

But they seem to have a shop on the garden centre site on the A38 at Ivybridge. But that's on the westbound side and involves a complex detour if you are heading east. But it's in the plan to go there when I'm next down in March.

But I have bought Langage clotted cream in Tesco in Watford, so all is not lost.
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Re: Devonshire Cut Rounds

Postby scullion » January 6th, 2011, 3:06 pm

what? not rodda's? shame on you!

p.s. https://www.roddas.co.uk/shop/ (by post - i know it is a bit expensive but....., a chap i was at uni in london with, back in the late 70's, had a a pot posted up by his parents every week!)
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Re: Devonshire Cut Rounds

Postby StokeySue » January 6th, 2011, 3:50 pm

You can buy Rodda's in Waitrose in London Scullion

I am always amused in North Carolina by "biscuits and gravy" - a local obsession. I remind them not to try it with the shortbread biscuits I take over.

Ways to eat biscuits in NC (this is a great diner)

http://www.mamadips.com/breakfast4.shtml
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Re: Devonshire Cut Rounds

Postby frenchcheesequeen » January 6th, 2011, 6:25 pm

Thunder and lightning sounds familiar but I thought it was Devon rather than Cornwall. I buy Rodda's in ASDA locally, as Linda and Spotted Dick can confirm since I gave them scones with a cup of tea one day when they were over here.
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Re: Devonshire Cut Rounds

Postby scullion » January 7th, 2011, 2:08 pm

i'm glad to hear it both of you! yes, it is expensive by post, but it does make a nice present sometimes.
you do realise that after christmas (and at other times ) when it is reduced to a very silly price in the supermarkets, that you can freeze clotted cream?
i often pick up the tubs containing a couple of pounds when they are about 50p and cut them into squares when they are half frozen so we can use a small bit at a time.
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Re: Devonshire Cut Rounds

Postby StokeySue » January 7th, 2011, 2:15 pm

scullion wrote:you do realise that after christmas (and at other times ) when it is reduced to a very silly price in the supermarkets, that you can freeze clotted cream?


No I didn't - but I think I have just decided that I AM going home via Waitrose after all. Thanks!
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Re: Devonshire Cut Rounds

Postby Chou7x » January 7th, 2011, 6:30 pm

Hi Everyone
Hope you enjoyed the programme
If anyone would like a printout of the recipe and some photos, just email me at richard.hunt@richardsonhotels.co.uk

All the Best

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Re: Devonshire Cut Rounds

Postby StokeySue » January 7th, 2011, 6:34 pm

Hi Richard - thanks

We are toady very excited by the clotted cream pastry (and the lambie pie generally)

Don't know if you have seen that thread?

Here
viewtopic.php?f=13&t=2965&p=76375#p76375
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Re: Devonshire Cut Rounds

Postby Foodycat » January 7th, 2011, 8:25 pm

scullion wrote: hmmm... the solid sheet of cream closest to the ice cream ....quick fantasy there!


I thought I was the only one who had woken up to the delights of that bit! heaven!
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Re: Devonshire Cut Rounds

Postby scullion » January 7th, 2011, 10:01 pm

no, sorry, i've been indulging for a few decades here - it is the only way to eat an ice cream - you can keep the 99, give me clotted cream any day - sublime.
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Re: Devonshire Cut Rounds

Postby pattypike » January 7th, 2011, 11:40 pm

Thank goodness we now have the proper recipe for cut rounds :kneel:
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Re: Devonshire Cut Rounds

Postby Janner » January 12th, 2011, 4:35 pm

I am 87 going on 88 and when I was boy I never saw cut rounds or scones supporting cream and jam as tasty as they can be. Possibly my childhood had limited gastronomic horizons but I recall always having 'splits' or 'tuffs' which were small soft rolls made with milk. Believe me, you youngsters, a cream tea with well made scones is fantastic, but with splits it is nirvana! Incidentally splits were a ha'penny (old money, approx. £0.002) each and 13 to the bakers dozen.
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Re: Devonshire Cut Rounds

Postby pinkmacaroon » January 13th, 2011, 3:48 pm

Janner wrote:I recall always having 'splits' or 'tuffs' which were small soft rolls made with milk. Believe me, you youngsters, a cream tea with well made scones is fantastic, but with splits it is nirvana! Incidentally splits were a ha'penny (old money, approx. £0.002) each and 13 to the bakers dozen.


I so agree, I haven't had them for years. My sister used to get them at school at break.
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Re: Devonshire Cut Rounds

Postby FoodMary » March 9th, 2012, 12:53 pm

I have only just found this thread. For me "Thunder and Lightning" is Devonshire. My English Grandmother, from Devon, (who was an established professional cook) made it for us, we not only had it on scones but on toast too. She also made "rounds" as she called them and topped with cream and jam. Her lardy cake, simnel cake and saffron cake were to die for :hungry: I don't have her recipe for rounds but do have the recipes for the cakes.

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Re: Devonshire Cut Rounds

Postby StokeySue » March 9th, 2012, 1:01 pm

I have a faint memory that when I was a child bakers (in Hampshire) sold "Devonshire Spilts" - a light yeast-risen bun, but sold pre-filled with jam and confectione's cream (the horrible stuff akin to coffee whitener, unfortunately)
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Re: Devonshire Cut Rounds

Postby Fiona » March 9th, 2012, 2:25 pm

great thread, I must try some of these recipes.

I have no clue about the 'traditional' way to make them, and I only have one memory of them, a recipe we had to make at school, they were called 'Devonshire Splits' and were soft, sweet, light, yeast risen buns filled with seedless jam and fresh whipped cream.

I ate them all before I got home, my mum was mad with me as they were to serve as dessert for all the family, I remember the rant about how much money it had all cost! and that she had not made another dessert. All those stoney faces staring at me as a makeshift dessert was rustled up!!! But they were sooooooooooo worth it! mmmmmm!

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